Recognise Member’s Contribution in Awards

Do you know someone who deserves a special THANK YOU?

by Margery Naylor, Regional Commissioner 

Bear Gryllis with Scouts

If you do, please recommend them for an award. There is a range of awards in Scouting and I can assist you to make an application for someone who has made a real contribution to working with young people. The awards include the Silver Wolf, the Silver Acorn, the Award for Merit and the Medal for Meritorious Conduct. In 2017, we were 4th in the level of awards given out to our members – 9.33% of our members, compared to 14.5% in South West Scotland, which had the highest level of all 8 Regions. We can do better in recognising the impact of our adult volunteers!

The Association has a national awards system for recognising good service, length of service and special acts of heroism and bravery, courage or endurance, and devotion to duty under suffering. Because it is a national system, it has prestige and allows all applications to be considered objectively according to national criteria. Except in the case of recognition of length of adult service, awards are not made automatically. Proper, detailed justification must be made in every case.

Bear Grylls writes, “For many years our Association has had a scheme providing formal recognition of good adult service. It also recognises special acts of bravery, quick thinking in the face of danger, courage and endurance for all young people and adults involved in the Movement. There is no mystery in the way our awards scheme works. The scheme is governed by rules laid down in POR which are administered by the Awards Board on my behalf. Applications have to be made through the Regional Commissioners to the Awards Board, whose members are charged with maintaining consistent standards across the United Kingdom”.

Find out more at: https://members.scouts.org.uk/awards or just email me to ask about making an application: rc@sesscouts.org.uk

Let’s give a real thank you to all those who work so hard in our Region!

Diane Ross MBE

Diane Ross MBE

Congratulations to Diane Ross on being awarded an MBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours in recognition of her service to Scouting and to the community in Edinburgh.

Diane was a Leader for the Cub Scout 80th Birthday item in the Edinburgh Gang Show 1996, was instrumental in the organisation and running of the Junior Gang when it was established in 1997 and remains an ardent Gang Show supporter.

Her leadership and commitment to Gang Show, as well as many other responsibilities in Scouting, is inspirational. Thank you Diane for your service and here’s to many more years of Scouting fun!

From the Gang Show Facebook page

Fraser gets QSA at Windsor

Fraser gets QSA at Windsor

Chief Scout Bear Grylls recognises 300 young people as Scouting’s top achievers

Fraser Dunmore of Craigalmond was one of 300 Queen’s Scouts being honoured by international adventurer Chief Scout, Bear Grylls, at Windsor Castle for gaining their Queen’s Scouts Awards on Sunday 22 April.  Bear was joined by Princess Beatrice of York.

The Queen’s Scout Award is the highest honour in Scouting and is awarded for outstanding personal achievement.  This honour is achieved by young people aged between 16 and 25 who have completed a range of challenges, including service to their community, completing an expedition in wild country, undertaking a five-day residential project in an unfamiliar environment and learning a new skill or developing an existing talent.

Chief Scout Bear Grylls said:

During their time Scouting, all these young people have worked incredibly hard to learn new skills and achieve their Queen’s Scout Award and I am so full of admiration for their spirit, grit and determination.  They have served their community, led others and undertaken expeditions in the UK and around the world. As Queen’s Scouts, they are leading lights and an inspiration to over half a million Scouts in the UK and I am so pleased that Scouting has honoured them today. I am just so proud of all they have achieved.

Fraser says of his Award:

I really enjoyed completing my Queen’s Scout Award as it got me to really challenge myself. It really pushed me to do more for the community and inspire others to do the same! I would totally recommend anyone to complete the award.

Going down to Windsor was an experience I will never forget! Everyone was really kind and we were all there as we have all overcome some great challenges. It was amazing to hear all about other people’s experience while completing their award. It was really special to have talks from Bear Grylls and was even more amazing that they managed to get a video of Obama saying congratulations to all of us. The day was really hot and everyone was getting dehydrated but the QSWP looked after us all so well. My favourite part was getting a selfie with Bear Grylls! I would totally recommend anyone to complete the award so they can get the opportunity to go down to Windsor Castle too!

Queen's Scout Award badge

Queen’s Scout Award

 

Presentations at Windsor

The annual Windsor Castle event has been held regularly since 1934 on the Sunday nearest to St George’s Day (23 April).  St George is the Patron Saint of Scouting. Since the Queen’s Scout Award was instigated, over 100,000 of these awards have been presented to young men and women for outstanding personal achievements and service to their local communities.  They have learnt new skills and taken part in many of the 200 different activities on offer by Scouting across the UK.

The Queen's Scout Award

The Queen’s Scout Award is achieved by completing the following requirements:

  • Providing service to the community for 12 months. Briefing and training should be given in order to gain the necessary skills.
  • Learning a new skill for 12 months, and show progress and lasting interest. The skill can be the development of an existing interest or something entirely new.
  • Completing a four-day and three-night expedition in open or adventurous country by foot, cycle, horse, canoe, boat or dinghy. The expedition should involve careful preparation, training, responsibility and review demonstrating leadership and teamwork skills
  • Completing a five-day and four-night residential project in an unfamiliar environment with people who are not known. This project should be environmental work, activity based, service to others or personal training
  • Completing 18 nights away, of which 12 must be camping.
  • Making a presentation, to a suitable audience, of your achievements so far in working towards the Queen’s Scout Award.

The Award is for Explorers aged 16 and over and Network members.  It must be completed by the age of 25.  It is essential to register for the Award.  See details on Scouts UK site.

Youth Approved Award for Region

Youth Approved Award for Region

This month the Region achieved its Foundation Youth Approved award from Scouts Scotland. We are over the moon with this award and shall be displaying it on most of our future comms and putting the certificate in the reception of Bonaly.

For those of you not too familiar with the Youth Approved Award, the Region had to:

  1. Have a Regional Youth Advisory Group – and the fact that makes us even prouder about these extraordinary 13 young people is that they represent all 7 Districts giving a true spread of experience and opinions.
  2. Appoint a Youth Commissioner – Euan McFadzean was appointed at the first meeting and has been working his socks off supporting the group and working with the Districts and Scottish to involve more young people.
  3. Have a method of communicating with Young People – Social Media is our gateway to getting young people involved and getting information to them, and with this is mind we will be improving how we use social media to this end.

Above all, we must mention all the incredible Groups and Sections within our Region who have achieved Foundation and Bronze – we are so proud.

Adam Bennett      Assistant Regional Commissioner (Youth Involvement)

Natalia gets top award

Natalia gets top award

Natalia, aged 9, was presented with The Cornwell Scout Badge and the Meritorious Conduct Award, in recognition of her devotion and enthusiasm for Scouting despite suffering a life-threatening illness and undergoing major surgery and for showing great courage throughout.  She received the Cornwell Badge, a certificate and also a letter of congratulations from Chief Scout Bear Grylls.

Natalia joined 92nd Pentland Beavers based at Dalry Primary school in August 2015 and moved up to Cubs in January 2017.  She then spent several months in hospital, but as soon as she was well enough she was itching to get back to our group. She re-joined us in August 2017 like she’d never been away she is a very enthusiastic member of our group.

She was presented with her award as a surprise at Dalry Primary school during assembly on Monday 27 November.  Natalia is the first Young Person in our group to be awarded this prestigious honour.

Angela Smith, Group Scout Leader

About the Cornwell Scout Badge

The Cornwell Scout Badge is awarded in respect of pre-eminently high character and devotion to duty, together with great courage and endurance.

It is restricted to Beaver Scouts, Cub Scouts, Scouts, Explorer Scouts and Scout Network Members. Both the bronze badge and the cloth emblem of the same design may be worn.

John ‘Jack’ Travers Cornwell, a Scout in the St. Mary’s Mission Group, Manor Park, London, entered the Royal Navy in 1915. It was wartime and training was brief, but Jack, helped by his days in Scouting, was able to adapt quickly.

On 31 May 1916 while serving in HMS Chester, Jack was struck by a shell splinter. Grievously wounded, he stayed at his post awaiting orders until he was relieved at the end of the battle. On reaching port, Jack was transferred to a hospital in Grimsby and three days later he died a national hero.

For gallantry he was given both the Victoria Cross and the highest Scouting award, the Bronze Cross. To commemorate the courage shown by Jack, The Scout Association created ‘The Cornwell Scout Badge’ in his memory.

From Scouting UK site.

Top Awards for Explorers and Network

Logo of South East Scotland Scouts 2018

 

Information on all the awards is available below, and on the Scouts Scotland site. You are welcome to contact the Region to discuss the best way to support individuals or groups. It is worth noting that the Mencap Gateway Award is available for people (of any age) with a learning disability and that it can be done along with DofE.

DofE Bronze

DofE Bronze award badgeDofE Bronze can be the main part of CSA Platinum, and leads on to DofE Silver.

CSA Platinum

Chief Scout's Award PlatinumThe Chief Scout’s Platinum Award leads on to CSA Diamond.

DofE Silver

DofE Silver award badgeDofE Silver can be the main part of CSA Diamond.

CSA Diamond

Chief Scouts Diamond AwardThe Chief Scout’s Diamond Award leads on to the Queen’s Scout Award.

DofE Gold

DofE Gold Award badgeDofE Gold is the highest level of DofE and can be the main part of the Queen’s Scout Award.

QSA

Queen's Scout Award badge The Queen’s Scout Award is the highest in Scouting.

Explorer Belt

Badge of the Explorer Belt award The Explorer Belt is an expedition abroad for Explorers and Network aged 16-25.

SOWA

Badge of the Scouts of the World award The Scouts of the World Award is for members of Network, working individually.

Get advice on awards

Chief Scout’s Award, Queen’s Scout Award and Duke of Edinburgh’s Award

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award is complementary to the Chief Scout’s Awards and the Queen’s Scout Award, and both sets of awards fit perfectly within the Explorer Scout programme.

Scouting and DofE

The Adventure Begins: Explore and Achieve with the Scout Association and the Duke of Edinburgh's Award

The Adventure Begins

Two awards at the same time

The requirements of the two sets of awards are very similar: for example, an Explorer who completes DofE Bronze has only a few extra requirements to complete Chief Scout’s Platinum. The best explanation is given in The Adventure Begins. Many Explorers count being a Young Leader for the Volunteering section of DofE. All Explorers, including Young Leaders, are encouraged to do both DofE and the Scouting awards.  Those who do DofE at school can ask their Explorer Leader to use it towards the equivalent Scouting award.  Network members who are Leaders can count this for Volunteering or Service.

Expeditions

Expeditions are part of most of the Awards and there is a lot of advice available.  Much of it provided by DofE but it is relevant to any expedition. See our Expedition Information page. All expeditions must be carried out in keeping with the requirements of The Scout Association, including Activity Permits and Nights Away; for Explorers this may involve the issuing of an Event Passport.

Scouting Awards

Information about CSA and QSA for Explorers, Network, Leaders and Commissioners

Reach the Top!

The Queen’s Scout Award

Queen's Scout Award logo

The Queen’s Scout Award

Please note that you must register for QSA to start, and have a mentor in place to help you.  If you are an Explorer, your leader is likely to do this.  Those over 18 should contact their District or the Region for help.

QSA and DofE Gold

DofE Gold Award badgeQueen's Scout Award badge

It should be remembered that candidates have until they are 25 to complete DofE Gold and The Queen’s Scout Award, so they should not give up if they have not completed them when they leave Explorers.  Any Network member can do the awards.

The other Awards

The Explorer Belt – an international experience

Badge of the Explorer Belt award The Explorer Belt is not just for Explorers!  In fact it can be done by Explorers aged 16 and over, by Network members and by members of Girlguiding aged 16 and over.

The Explorer Belt is a challenge of a lifetime. It is a chance to take part in a ten day expedition that brings you a real understanding of a different country, its culture and way of life. You will develop this understanding by travelling through your chosen country, working as part of a small team to complete a series of projects and most importantly by meeting local people. It is an experience and an achievement that you will remember for the rest of your life.

For full information and to register, see Explorer Belt on Scouts UK.

SOWA – Scouts of the World Award

Just for Network!

Scouts of the World Badge SOWA is an individual award, and the project can be completed at home or abroad.  It does not require an expedition. Here is a summary of what is required:

  • Be a member of Scout Network.
  • Attend a residential weekend Scouts of the World Discovery, based on the three themes: development, environment and peace.
  • With the support of your mentor, finalise your plans for your voluntary project based on the theme from your discovery weekend.
  • Undertake Scouts of the World voluntary service, either in the UK or abroad, lasting a minimum of 80 hours, recording and evaluating your experiences in the participant handbook.
  • Undertake a presentation locally.

For full information and to register, see SOWA on Scouts UK.