Gang Show auditions

Gang Show auditions

Edinburgh Gang Show 2018

King’s Theatre – Tue 20 to Sat 24 November 2018

Audition Information for Scouting

The Edinburgh Gang Show is a major theatre production and has been staged annually at the King’s Theatre since 1960. The cast is made entirely of members of Scouting and Girlguiding and is supported behind the scenes by many adult volunteers. Being part of the Gang Show is great fun but hard work and a high level of commitment to the show is expected.

Auditions for Main Gang
Scouts, Explorer Scouts and Scout Network from South East Scotland Scouts
  • Sunday 13 May 2018
  • 1.45 – 6.00pm
  • St Anne’s Parish Church, Kaimes Road, Edinburgh
Boys
  • 1.45 – 3.00pm             All boys aged 10 years & over (by the Dress rehearsal on 19/11/18)
Girls
  • 2.45 – 4.00pm             Girls aged 12 years & over (by the Dress rehearsal on 19/11/18)
  • 3.45 – 5.00pm             Girls aged 11 years (by the Dress rehearsal on 19/11/18)
  • 4.45 – 6.00pm             Girls aged 10 years (by the Dress rehearsal on 19/11/18)
Membership of Main Gang

All individuals who wish to audition for Main Gang must be at least 10 years old at the date of the Dress Rehearsal (19/11/18) and an active member of a Guide Unit or Scout Group at that date. In addition, all who audition for Main Gang must also be an active member of the Guide and Scout Association at the date of the audition (a date which varies from year to year but this year is 13/05/18).

Older Brownies and Cubs at the date of the audition may become members of the Main Gang provided they meet the age and membership criteria by the date of the Dress Rehearsal.

Results of the auditions will be advised on the day.

If successful, further auditions for song, dance and sketches will take place in June with rehearsals commencing for Main Gang in late August. With the exception of a couple of dates, rehearsals will be held every Sunday from then through to show week. Cast members are expected to attend regularly and show a high level of commitment to the show.

After the auditions, a rehearsal schedule and a Registration Form (to be signed by a Section Leader) will be issued to those who have been successful, along with other information.

To aid with registration on the day please complete the Audition Form in advance and bring to the audition along with the Activity Information Form.

Further information available by e-mailing edingangshow@hotmail.co.uk.

Auditions for Junior Gang
Cub Scouts from South East Scotland Scouts
  • Sunday 27 May 2018
  • St Anne’s Parish Church, Kaimes Road, Edinburgh
Boys and girls aged 8 years by the auditions on 27/05/18
  • 4.00 – 5.15pm

Note: Cubs do all performances.

Cubs must be at least 8 and a member of a Cub Pack at the date of the audition (a date which varies from year to year but this year is 27/05/18). As a member of Junior Gang, they must remain with their Pack until after the show week.

Cubs will be told the results of the auditions on the day. If successful, rehearsals will commence for Junior Gang in September.

After the auditions, a schedule of rehearsal dates and a Registration Form (to be signed by a Section Leader) will be issued to those who have been successful, along with other information.

To aid with registration on the day please complete the Audition Form in advance and bring to the audition along with the Activity Information Form.

Further information available by e-mailing edingangshow@hotmail.co.uk.

Braid in Denmark 2017

Braid in Denmark 2017

Last summer the Danish Scout Associations came together to run a National Jamboree.  Having experienced fantastic Danish Jamborees several times before, a contingent made up of 65 Cubs, Scouts, Explorers, Network and Leaders from 4th Braid, 103rd Braid and Greenbank Explorers embarked on a trip to Jamboree Denmark 2017.

 

Group on the ferry

Cubs, Scouts and leaders on the ferry

We travelled by coach to Newcastle and then overnight ferry to Amsterdam where another coach took us the almost 9 hours through Netherlands and Germany into Denmark.  Our kit travelled on the same ferry in a large van.

Feedback from the young people was that the coach to Newcastle was a bit cramped (5 seats across) however that this was more than made up with the “luxury” coach we’d hire for the continent.

Aerial photo of the site

The whole site

On arriving in Denmark, our van drivers had managed to negotiate access to drive our kit all the way onto our site and therefore we only had to carry personal kit the 1km from the coach drop-off point to our site.  One
downside of the time of our method of travel was that we had to pitch our sleeping tents as it got dark.  Only one modification required in the morning as we’d pitched one of the leaders’ tents over a ditch.   With such a large group, we had decided to bring a marquee without the side walls which was quickly pitched before breakfast on Sunday morning.  The Danes are very traditional in their camping with a focus on skills such as pioneering and an expectation that food is cooked on open fires.  We therefore spent most of the day on Sunday building our fireplaces, tables and benches, true Danish style out of pioneering poles (topped off with plywood table tops we’d prepared and brought from Edinburgh).

Throughout the day on Sunday we also took some time to explore the site (which was 2km x 2.5km large).

After lots of hard work on Sunday it was time for the evening opening ceremony.  This brought together all 40,000 participants.  This was quite an experience, although some of our young people found it difficult to follow, as unsurprisingly it was mostly in Danish.

Scouts back from hike

After the hike

During the week the young people took part in a wide variety of activities.  There was a good mix of activities to suit our full age range.  Some of the activities we had signed up individuals or groups in advance, some we could just drop in to and others were set activities for the whole group / sub camp to do.  For many of the activities the Scottish Scouts took part alongside Scouts from other countries and made new friends.

Liftin car with pioneering poles

Lifting car

One activity that was a favourite with both Scouts and Explorers was the world’s largest inflatable “The Beast”.  A couple of days of activities featured patrols of Scouts paired with a patrol from another country and going around a variety of challenges.  These activities ranged from carving whistles, lifting a car with pioneering poles & pulleys to launching water rockets.

Racing chariot made of poles

Chariot race

One day was designated a sub camp day when the whole of our sub camp came together to build and race chariots.

One afternoon we held a joint camp fire with our Danish neighbours.

Having been apart for most of the day, our group came together each evening to eat our dinner under our marquee.  Explorers and Scouts take turns days about to prepare dinner for everyone using recipes from the Danish Camp Cookbook and a bit of improvisation depending on what ingredients could be sourced from the food supply tent.

Food preparation

Preparing food

After a great week the camp finished with the closing ceremony.  We then departed the site about 3am to travel back to Amsterdam.  We made good time and had a few hours explorer the centre of Amsterdam before taking the ferry back to the UK.

Some quotes from those who took part

“I enjoyed the giant inflatable (The “Beast”).  I didn’t enjoy the opening and closing ceremonies because these were in Danish.  However, I did like the fact that there were so many people there.”

“Absolutely class, slip and slide bouncy castle was good and the rainbow café was my favourite destination because I could really let my hair down.”

“I really enjoyed meeting some Norwegian Scouts and becoming friends.”

“We met lots of nice people from different countries and it was a great experience.”

“My favourite bit was eating, sleeping and cycling around the town in the rain and the Beast, it was so much fun.”

“One night we went to the International Camp Fire.  There were Japanese singers, Greek Scouts and Danish people there.  Other Scottish Scouts were there.  We got to meet new people.”

“The best thing was meeting Scouts from other countries, it’s not something I’d expected to be my favourite part before leaving Scotland.”

Group in boat

Boating at the camp

“Our whole experience in Denmark was AMAZING, there was so many fun and exciting activities to do” Our five favourite activities were 5) Star Gazing, 4) Sailing, 3) Cycle Hike 2) Raft Building and last of all our favourite activity was 1) The Beast.”

“The travel was very fun, 18 hours ferry, 9 hours coach, nice coach by the way 5 Star.  Activities all were very fun as well meet a lot of new people.  The cycle is good go for pink bike with basket on front.  The exhibition was very fun as well meet people from different countries.  The journey back in Amsterdam is very good nice sightseeing and also go along the backroads of the city.”

“We met some wonderful Danish Scouts whom we shared our unique Scottish customs with.  It was a life-changing and unique experience which I count myself extremely lucky to have been a part of.”

Scottish and Danish Scouts together

With our Danish neighbours

 

What Expedition Achieved

  • All the Young People had a great international experience, meeting Scouts and Guides from across the world and taking part in activities with many different people
  • A joint expedition between two Scout troops, an Explorer Unit & Network established strong links which will help with the transition particularly from Scouts to Explorers
  • Pre-expedition fundraising involved parents as well as young people / leaders and therefore generated new areas of support for both groups and the unit.
  • Greater independence and confidence especially of younger scouts.

Lessons learnt / What we would do differently

  • Each Jamboree, even ones in the same country only 9 years apart, can be very different.
  • Make more effort, earlier, to make links with the Danish Group we were to camp next to.
  • Rather than leaving camp in the early hours of the morning it would have been better to leave around midnight after closing ceremony and to travel through the night, then spending almost a full day in Amsterdam.

Group in Amsterdam

Exploring Amsterdam

William Lyburn Fund

  • We would like to thank the William Lyburn fund for the grant we received.
  • Knowing we had received the grant gave us an important contingency fund against unexpected events, particularly uncertainty caused by the volatility of the exchange rate during the period before the trip. In the end we were also able to also use the grant specifically to pay for extras which greatly enhanced to overall trip for the young people who took part.  These extras included:
    • The Explorers enjoyed two excursions into town including pizza lunch and swimming.
    • The Scouts enjoyed a swimming excursion into town and a movie in the cinema on the ferry.

James Sievewright, expedition leader

Abseil Falkirk Wheel and raise funds

Abseil Falkirk Wheel and raise funds

Your chance to abseil off the Falkirk Wheelhave you got the nerve?

Are you brave enough to abseil down Scotland’s iconic Falkirk Wheel and raise money for Scouting?  If so, join Scouts Scotland on Saturday 14 and Sunday 15 April.  It’s a great way of fundraising for international trips or for day to day running costs for your group. There are 40 places available on the Saturday and 60 available on the Sunday.

For each participant there is a £30 registration to pay. You are then asked to confirm your commitment to raising a minimum of £150. Of this, minimum sponsorship of £50 goes to Scout Scotland and everything else goes towards either your individual international Scout trips or for your Groups / Districts.

With past experience of running such events, on average individuals raise between £200 and £450 each. So far there are 10 participants from 2 groups in North Angus taking part and they have opted to raise money for their summer trip to Ireland. If they hit their fundraising targets(taken from their individual fundraising pages) they look set to raise between £4,000 and £5,000 for their group.

If you are interested, the link to sign up can be found here or contact Ally Caulfield at Ally@scouts.scot.

Regional Youth Advisory Group

Regional Youth Advisory Group

On Sunday 26 November in the 71st Craigalmond Scout Hall, we had at least one youth representative from each district in South East Scotland come along to be part of the first meeting of the Regional Youth Advisory Group.  The meeting lasted three hours, a vast amount was discussed and lots of pizza was eaten. Continue Reading Regional Youth Advisory Group

Top Awards for Explorers and Network

Logo of South East Scotland Scouts 2018

 

Information on all the awards is available below, and on the Scouts Scotland site. You are welcome to contact the Region to discuss the best way to support individuals or groups. It is worth noting that the Mencap Gateway Award is available for people (of any age) with a learning disability and that it can be done along with DofE.

DofE Bronze

DofE Bronze award badgeDofE Bronze can be the main part of CSA Platinum, and leads on to DofE Silver.

CSA Platinum

Chief Scout's Award PlatinumThe Chief Scout’s Platinum Award leads on to CSA Diamond.

DofE Silver

DofE Silver award badgeDofE Silver can be the main part of CSA Diamond.

CSA Diamond

Chief Scouts Diamond AwardThe Chief Scout’s Diamond Award leads on to the Queen’s Scout Award.

DofE Gold

DofE Gold Award badgeDofE Gold is the highest level of DofE and can be the main part of the Queen’s Scout Award.

QSA

Queen's Scout Award badge The Queen’s Scout Award is the highest in Scouting.

Explorer Belt

Badge of the Explorer Belt award The Explorer Belt is an expedition abroad for Explorers and Network aged 16-25.

SOWA

Badge of the Scouts of the World award The Scouts of the World Award is for members of Network, working individually.

Get advice on awards

Chief Scout’s Award, Queen’s Scout Award and Duke of Edinburgh’s Award

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award is complementary to the Chief Scout’s Awards and the Queen’s Scout Award, and both sets of awards fit perfectly within the Explorer Scout programme.

Scouting and DofE

The Adventure Begins: Explore and Achieve with the Scout Association and the Duke of Edinburgh's Award

The Adventure Begins

Two awards at the same time

The requirements of the two sets of awards are very similar: for example, an Explorer who completes DofE Bronze has only a few extra requirements to complete Chief Scout’s Platinum. The best explanation is given in The Adventure Begins. Many Explorers count being a Young Leader for the Volunteering section of DofE. All Explorers, including Young Leaders, are encouraged to do both DofE and the Scouting awards.  Those who do DofE at school can ask their Explorer Leader to use it towards the equivalent Scouting award.  Network members who are Leaders can count this for Volunteering or Service.

Expeditions

Expeditions are part of most of the Awards and there is a lot of advice available.  Much of it provided by DofE but it is relevant to any expedition. See our Expedition Information page. All expeditions must be carried out in keeping with the requirements of The Scout Association, including Activity Permits and Nights Away; for Explorers this may involve the issuing of an Event Passport.

Scouting Awards

Information about CSA and QSA for Explorers, Network, Leaders and Commissioners

Reach the Top!

The Queen’s Scout Award

Queen's Scout Award logo

The Queen’s Scout Award

Please note that you must register for QSA to start, and have a mentor in place to help you.  If you are an Explorer, your leader is likely to do this.  Those over 18 should contact their District or the Region for help.

QSA and DofE Gold

DofE Gold Award badgeQueen's Scout Award badge

It should be remembered that candidates have until they are 25 to complete DofE Gold and The Queen’s Scout Award, so they should not give up if they have not completed them when they leave Explorers.  Any Network member can do the awards.

The other Awards

The Explorer Belt – an international experience

Badge of the Explorer Belt award The Explorer Belt is not just for Explorers!  In fact it can be done by Explorers aged 16 and over, by Network members and by members of Girlguiding aged 16 and over.

The Explorer Belt is a challenge of a lifetime. It is a chance to take part in a ten day expedition that brings you a real understanding of a different country, its culture and way of life. You will develop this understanding by travelling through your chosen country, working as part of a small team to complete a series of projects and most importantly by meeting local people. It is an experience and an achievement that you will remember for the rest of your life.

For full information and to register, see Explorer Belt on Scouts UK.

SOWA – Scouts of the World Award

Just for Network!

Scouts of the World Badge SOWA is an individual award, and the project can be completed at home or abroad.  It does not require an expedition. Here is a summary of what is required:

  • Be a member of Scout Network.
  • Attend a residential weekend Scouts of the World Discovery, based on the three themes: development, environment and peace.
  • With the support of your mentor, finalise your plans for your voluntary project based on the theme from your discovery weekend.
  • Undertake Scouts of the World voluntary service, either in the UK or abroad, lasting a minimum of 80 hours, recording and evaluating your experiences in the participant handbook.
  • Undertake a presentation locally.

For full information and to register, see SOWA on Scouts UK.