Borders Brass Monkeys are 50

Borders Brass Monkeys are 50

On Saturday 27 January 100 Scouts and Young Leaders arrived at Kelso racecourse ready for the Brass Monkey camp, and to celebrate 50 years since these started in the Borders.

An early leader catches up on what he started.

One of the early leaders

In 1968 Jack Robb, the DC of Roxburghshire, decided to run a one-night camp to challenge the Scouts. He decided to code-name it the Brass Monkey camp. The first one was held in Scotchkershope and had around 45 Scouts in attendance.  The camp was a huge success and very quickly over the next few years attracted Scouts not just from the Borders but from all over Scotland, England and even Wales. Local Scouter Bill Watt got involved from the early camps and recently Marion Macintosh, one of the Borders ADCs, had the great pleasure of visiting him and letting him know how it is still running and showed him the trophy we use. He remembers one camp where it was so cold they had to go to the local ironmongers to get large iron nails instead of pegs! Bill still has his original neckie! He is very pleased to hear that we still keep the book going too!

The largest camp had over 400 in attendance.  Every participant that attended was awarded their Brass Monkey neckie and later a badge.  One camp in the 80s is noted as being so cold that the calor gas bottles froze overnight!. The Scouts were unable to take up their tent pegs due to the frozen ground and when the camp returned to this site in 2009 tent pegs were found!  The venue for the Brass Monkey  camp changed every year. One of the traditions that started early on is that the participants were all asked to sign the Brass Monkey book. This tradition is still on-going and it’s great to be able to look back over the years at the history of the camp.

In 1984 a trophy was presented as a gift from a Scout group in Wales. It was to be awarded to someone that had contributed to the running of the camp. This trophy is a Brass Monkey in a kilt. It was first awarded to Jack Robb and it is still awarded today. In the past there were also pottery mugs and pottery woggles!

Bubble football at KelsoThis year’s camp took place at Kelso racecourse where the Scouts camped on the side of the racecourse. They had an afternoon of activities, a mixture of fun, adventurous activities and Scouting skills, including, for the first time, axe throwing. They were also treated to bubble football at Kelso High School where the main concern was that the Scouts might actually take off in the wind!  The evening activities included Zumba and a movie with the Sunday morning seeing all the participants take part in an ‘urban-eering’ course around Kelso.  The Young Leaders at the camp were given the opportunity to work with the ESL (YL) on their Young Leader missions and modules, too.  The weather, whilst not as cold as the previous weekend’s snow, was windy and, in true Scottish fashion, a bit dreich.  The Scouts and the leader team all had a great camp and are looking forward to next year’s camp.

Happy 50th to the Borders Brass Monkey camps!

Cheryl Turpie ADC

Graham Coulson Kelpie Tamer

Graham Coulson Kelpie Tamer

A long-serving Scout Master from Selkirk has won a public vote to be immortalised in a mosaic artwork.

Graham Coulson has achieved many things in Scouting and elsewhere, but this is the first time he – or any other Scout leader, I would guess – has been selected by public vote to be incorporated in a piece of artwork.  The work, designed by artist Svetlana Kondakova, is part of her flood defence project.

See further information, with photos, on the Border Telegraph website.

John Buchanan

Sleeping out in an Igloo

Sleeping out in an Igloo

When the Beast from the East hit and snow disrupted life across our Region, one enterprising Scouting family took the chance to raise money for the Tweed Valley Mountain Rescue Team.

Cheryl Turpie, Group Scout Leader at Cardrona, followed her sons in sleeping overnight in their igloo, and their example was followed by Craig Turpie, who is Chairman of the World Scout Committee.

This ticks a lot of Scouting boxes: young people working with adults, learning by doing, having fun outdoors to help the community …

So far, they have raised over £2000!  Tim Kidd, UK Chief Commissioner has commented on Twitter:

Tim Kidd 1

Tim Kidd 2

You can find information, including a video, on the SES Scouts Twitter feed, and further details and a chance to contribute to this excellent charity, can be found here.

 

 

 

WSJ journey begins

WSJ journey begins

Almost 8 months ago the Jamboree journey began for the South East Scotland unit when our four Unit Leaders were selected from applicants across Scotland.

Leading the unit is Alan Gibson who is an Assistant Explorer Scout Leader with South Morningside Explorer Scout Unit (SMESU), Braid District.  Making up the leader team are: Mark Petrie Cub Scout Leader 16th Craigalmond, Gillian Swarbrigg Assistant Scout Leader, West Region and Rhona Robb Assistant District Commissioner (AT), Clyde Region.

All our unit leaders have a vast amount of Scouting experiences under their belts, including many International events and World Scout Jamborees including Japan, Sweden, UK and South Korea.   We believe we have a strong leadership team ready to support the unit of 36 young people when they embark on their adventure of a lifetime to the 24th World Scout Jamboree to be held in West Virginia in the summer of 2019.

November saw our selection weekend at Bonaly where we welcomed around 60 Scouts and Explorer Scouts over the weekend. Each had submitted an application that included a personal statement and testimony from their own sections leaders.  The calibre and enthusiasm of the young people made for a most enjoyable weekend for the volunteers from the Region who came along to run team building bases and help in the incredibly difficult task of selecting just 36 young people to be part of the unit.  We are very pleased to say we have representatives from the following Districts:

Borders, Braid, Craigalmond, Edinburgh North East, Midlothian and Pentland.

The first of five training weekends will take place in February when the unit will gather again at Bonaly for the weekend.  This will be an opportunity for all the unit members to get to know each other, start forming their unit identity, plan different aspects of their training prior to the Jamboree and programming for the Jamboree experience itself.

You can follow the unit’s progress over the next 18 months on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/sescotlandwsj2019/ where the young people will have the  opportunity to share stories of this life-changing experience.

Lauderdale Scouts for Doddie Weir

Lauderdale Scouts for Doddie Weir

Doddie Weir isn’t just a hero to rugby fans all the way from Carter Bar up to John o’Groats. The rugby legend also holds a special place in the hearts of all associated with Lauderdale Scout Group as without the former Scotland international’s help, it might well not exist.

Text courtesy of The Southern Reporter – read the full article on their site.

Five years ago, the Group was struggling to attract both members and adult helpers, with fewer than 20 of the former on its books. Group Scout Leader Andy Beaumont turned to Doddie, dad of two of the group’s members at the time, for help, and the 47-year-old was only too happy to oblige and set up a group executive, taking the role of chairman. “The group began to thrive, and in 2013 it was presented with an award for the highest percentage growth in the whole of Scotland.  The group now has 150 youth members, with 38 adults helping at its daily meetings.”

Doddie stood down as chairman in April this year, and a couple of months later he revealed he had been diagnosed with motor neurone disease. To thank Doddie for the role he played in reviving its fortunes, the group held a sponsored walk through Lauderdale to his farm near Blainslie, drawing a turnout of about 200. It raised more than £3,000 for Doddie Weir’5 Discretionary Trust.

Read the full story in The Southern Reporter.