Culzean Camp for Cramond Scouts

by Mike Treanor, Scout Leader 82nd Cramond (Craigalmond) Scouts Cramond Camp 1

Our 2018 Summer Camp was held at Culzean Country Park Scout Camp in Ayrshire. Given the weather had been glorious for what seemed like months and months we were looking forward to a dry camp.  On arrival, the advance party had managed to do a great job putting up the marquees, mess tents and leader tents, despite a tyre blow out on the way there. On arrival, the 32 Scouts and Leader team put up the patrol Stormhavens and dining shelters just before a 48 hour monsoon arrived, which turned rock hard grass into a near swamp in no time at all!! The accompanying wind managed to fell a sizeable tree but fortunately no-one was hurt.

On the Saturday night we introduced our theme “Stranded on a Desert Island” with some familiar and not so familiar islands – Treasure Island, Coral Island (from Lord of the Flies), New Switzerland (from Swiss Family Robinson), Isla Nublar (from Jurassic Park) and Monuriki (from Castaway). The Scouts spent the first evening drawing maps of their islands and creating wooden signs from driftwood to name their patrol area (no camp fire given the ongoing rain).

On Sunday, after the first breakfast cooked by the Scouts we had our first patrol inspection (to set the camp standards) and then we visited the grounds in Culzean.  Unfortunately the rain continued to pour so we persuaded the camp trolley bus service to take us on a covered tour of the site before they kindly went out of their way to drop us off at the camp. We improvised with a Fifty Question Challenge which set the basis for our Patrol point’s challenge. As the rain eased we did some site maintenance, clearing the felled tree as well as removing an old fence and gathering mounds of wood for future camp-fires.

Monday saw us offsite at Maidens for our water sports day – the rain had eased and the sun shone for a while, with a glorious backdrop of Arran, including the Holy Isle and Goat Fell. The Scouts did a full on day, paddle boarding, kayaking and canoeing. Our Sea Scouts honed their skills whilst the others scouts learned new water skills, albeit a couple of Scouts unfortunately did not avoid jellyfish stings!! On the evening we did a “Lost at Sea” team building exercise where the Scouts had to select 12 from 32 items which would help them survive stranded on an island – after much debate and discussion, the selections were made with “positive attitude” being the unanimous favourite, followed by fire-lighting equipment, tarpaulins for shelter, knives, rope and safety pins to catch fish (or in one case, birds!!).  We were also able to have our first camp fire, with the young adult leaders doing a fantastic job in engaging the scouts in their favourite camp songs.

Scout Skills day took up most of Tuesday and again the Scouts learned a range of new skills including rope and pulley work (towing the minibus and pulling down dead trees), hammock and shelter building, axe and saw work (very popular), navigation and first aid skills (which were needed when the Scouts used their pen-knives for whittling their woggles!). In the evening we had to abandon our Beach BBQ given the rain, so we cooked in the dining shelters, although we did manage to cook dough bread and smores on Swedish Torches.

On Wednesday we split up, with the older Scouts preparing for and undertaking their overnight expedition and the younger Scouts spending the day in the grounds of Culzean. The expedition to Turnberry was undertaken in horrendous conditions, so the tarpaulins were abandoned and the tents erected. Despite the conditions the Scouts and Leaders stuck it out and came back Thursday morning, drenched and exhausted but very pleased they had met the challenge. The younger Scouts had a great day, making huge SOS signs on the beach using seaweed, rocks and other materials as well as spending an hour or so digging for treasure hidden at the end of a large rope buried in the sand. Unfortunately no fortunes were made. In the evening the younger Scouts searched for “unlabelled” tins for their dinner – macaroni cheese, meatballs, peaches and custard was the best find!! That evening we had a Desert Island themed competition, the most competitive event being the limbo.

Cramond Camp 2

On the Thursday afternoon, we all went to Girvan and had a brilliant afternoon at the RNLI station. Callum and his fellow volunteers showed us around their brand new state of the art boat costing £2.1m pounds as well as demonstrating how to put on their gear. The Scouts were really attentive, asked great questions and we were pleased to hand over a donation of £200.  After an hour of playing in the Girvan play park, we all had a massive meal of fish/sausage/haggis suppers in the evening sun (actually it was drizzle but we didn’t care!!). The local seagulls and some young teenagers tried their best to disrupt our meal but we all enjoyed a great feast. We finished the day with a massive camp fire where we burned all the material we collected earlier in the week followed by more camp songs.

We started to strike camp on Friday, trying to take tents down dry between the showers. The young adult leaders brought together a great “Olympics” with much competition to try to gain those points which would win the prizes. In the evening, Karen, our camp cook, surpassed the excellent service she had already provided during the week, with a superb BBQ banquet meal of kebabs, burgers and chocolate cake.

We closed the evening with our GSL, Graham Cullen,  presenting the Chief Scout Gold Award to 7 Scouts who after 4 plus years of attending Friday Scouts, engaging in activities and challenges and attending Easter and Summer Camps achieved the ultimate award – massive congratulations to them all.

Despite a little drizzle Saturday we were able to strike camp in good time, leaving the camp in good order and getting back to the Kirk at the target time. We had lots of help from parents in putting the kit away, and lots of volunteers to dry our tents.

So a great camp, in a wonderful location and the “positive attitude” certainly got us through the persistent rain. The Scouts were very well behaved, engaged in the activities, challenges and camp singing and gave the leaders very little bother. They were supported by an extensive and committed Leader team to whom I say a massive thanks.

AGM and Annual Review 2018

The Annual Review and Annual General Meeting is to be held on Wednesday 10 October 2018 at Queen Margaret University, University Drive, Musselburgh, Edinburgh EH21 6UU.  The Annual General Meeting will start at 7:00pm followed by the Annual Review.  Refreshments will be available at the end of the Annual Review.

This theme of the Annual Review this year is all Adventure! It’s the core of Scouting and it’s made possible by the hard work of you, our amazing leaders and supporters. Come and share in the great experiences that Beavers, Cubs, Scouts and Explorers have been having all year. The fun that young people (and leaders?) have and the skills they learn will stay with them all their lives. Let’s celebrate together the impact we make by hearing from the young people themselves, in their own words and photos. The venue at QMU is fantastic and it should be a most enjoyable evening!

You can attend the event without registering, however as we have to order catering in advance, it would be helpful if you could let us know if you are planning to come along by following the link and adding your details: www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ses-region-agm-and-annual-review-tickets-48426919219

Download the AGM papers here:

Craigalmond District Review

Craigalmond District Review

First, a warm welcome to everyone reading our 2017-18 annual review report.  As you will see, our various groups have being providing fantastic opportunities for our young people throughout the year. It has been a year of highs and lows, though. The highs are self-explanatory but the major low is that we desperately need more adult volunteers (both uniformed and non-uniformed) to be part of our fantastic team with the sole aim of ensuring that our Beavers, Cubs, Scouts and Explorers can fulfil their Scouting dreams. No experience necessary! If you are able to make a contribution, no matter how small, please let myself, the District Commissioner or any member know.

Congratulations must go to Graham Cullen, GSL at the 82nd who received the Chief Scout’s Commendation for Meritorious Conduct in recognition for his positive attitude to Scouting.

Congratulations also to Fraser Dunmore a Young Leader at the 30th who was one of 300 Queen’s Scouts being honoured by international adventurer Chief Scout, Bear Grylls, at Windsor Castle for gaining their Queen’s Scouts Awards on Sunday 22 April.  Bear was joined by Princess Beatrice of York.

On the international front, I am pleased to say we have really moved forward. More Groups are camping overseas. We have 2 patrols plus leaders at the Blair Atholl Jamborette in July for the first time in many years. Also, in 2019 we have Scouts and leaders selected for the World Scout Jamboree in the USA and an expedition to Madagascar. Concerning Youth Involvement we have appointed Katie as the Youth Involvement Commissioner and she has been working closely with the Groups to deliver the Youth Approved programme. Many sections now have their Foundation level and are working towards Bronze. We have started a District youth forum and soon they will appoint a Youth Commissioner to work in the District team.

Adult recruitment will remain a key focus for us and with increased house building in the Maybury and Kirkliston areas the demands for Scouting within the District are likely to come under significantly more pressure.

Russell Shoulder, District Chair

Beavers

Beavers practise circus skills

Circus skills

In December 2017 a Magic Show was held at Craigsbank Parish Church in Corstorphine. This was attended by almost 200 Beavers from most colonies in the district. The magician was Tricky Ricky who put on a Christmas- themed magician show, being that it was a December event! Tricky Ricky involved some of the Beavers during his performance and overall the event was a great success, feedback was that both adults and Beavers enjoyed themselves.

In April 2017 nearly 150 Beavers and adult helpers descended upon the Museum of Flight for a day of activities to gain their Air Activities badge. This included creating paper planes, going on Concorde at the museum (sadly only stationary!), learning about the history of flight and different types of plane on display from one of the museum staff. We were very fortunate with the weather considering the event was held in April with lovely sunny skies, the Beavers had lunch in groups among the displays.

Beavers with fire engine

Seeing a fire engine

Overall, the Beavers have had fantastic opportunities to broaden their horizons and learn new skills in the last year. Activities included (to name but a few):

  • A sleepover at the City Chambers
  • Learning the phonetic alphabet
  • Making pizza
  • Climbing at the Edinburgh International Climbing Centre
  • Learning circus skills
  • Camping
  • Supporting the Forth Hedgehog hospital
  • Road Safety

The leaders of each colony will be meeting in the next month to discuss and arrange district events for the coming year.

Sue Sibbald, ADC Beavers

Cubs

Last year at this time we were happily reflecting on the centenary of Cub Scouting and the hugely positive impact it had on youth numbers.  Cubs continue to be the biggest section and Increasing youth numbers are very encouraging but do bring issues around adult support too and pressure on leaders to contribute even more of their valuable time. Leaders have risen to this challenge and a very big thank you is due to all volunteers supporting Cub packs across the District, their time and effort is highly appreciated.

Cubs on spider frame

Cubs tackle spider frame

The District team (Kathleen Pullen, Niall Cockburn and Iain McBride) have been happy to roll our sleeves up and help leader teams throughout the year, supporting a number of packs to enable them to continue operating or go to camp.  This temporary support gives Groups breathing space to recruit and begin training new leaders and prevents section closure. Currently three packs are being supported in this way, allowing GSLs to focus on recruitment.

Inevitably, after the excitement of the centenary, this has been a more “business as usual” year, consolidating success. Congratulations to the 21st South Queensferry pack in winning the annual District Cub Football Competition.  and a District Cub camp in September.

Cubs at Bonaly

Awards at Bonaly

Offering more Cubs the chance of everyday adventure and now discovering Skills For Life, are The Scout Association’s unique selling points and thankfully there are positive signs of new adults joining to support established Cub leader teams in Craigalmond. Most packs operate parent rotas and the impact of these can’t be underestimated either.

Cubs in canoe

Cubs at Lochgoilhead

Numbers aren’t everything, and the District Cubs team have been bowled over by the many enthusiastic and dedicated leaders that we have met in the last twelve months, at meetings, Cub camps and events.  The quality of Scouting can only be increased by offering young people more outdoor activities, great programmes and the opportunity to influence the content through Youth Shaped Scouting.   It is great to see Cubs enjoying not only so many fun-packed programmes, exciting outings and amazing activities but also contributing to their communities, too (see the photos) – for example:

  • from swimming to rock climbing
  • from fox falls to fire lighting
  • from balsam bashing to beach clean ups
  • from electronic adventure at the Applestore to messy and fun super-Science nights
  • from visits to Warhammer to Hobbit-themed winter camps
  • camping at Canty Bay, Bonaly, Fordell, Barrwood, Meggernie and many more

It is heartening to see a steady stream of new and talented volunteers attracted to Cub Scouting to help the existing successful pack teams. Thanks are also due to a small but select band of Young Leaders who assist packs and greatly contribute to their success. Whilst there are a very small number on temporary closure, particular mention should be made of a new pack recently opened in the District, the first for a few years.

We are confident that Craigalmond Cubs will continue to grow from strength to strength and we also offer Cub leaders a challenge or three for the year ahead – go for an award in the Youth Shaped Scouting scheme, channel your Cubs towards more Chief Scout Silver Awards and (most importantly) enjoy your Scouting!

Iain MacBride, ADC Cubs, Kathleen Pullen, Ian Hunter, Niall Cockburn (DCSLs)

Scouts

Campfire - almost a bonfire!

District Camping Competition

I am extremely grateful to all the leaders who pulled the District Camping Competition together and made it possible. Special thanks must go to Jackie for leading and co-ordinating the event on top of her GSL responsibilities. They say its quality and not quantity that matter and its very true in this case.  What a great weekend it was with 12 teams entered and a large leadership support team from across the District all working together. They even let the DC camp with them and clean a few dixies. It would be good to see all troops represented next year.  The eventual winners were the 71st (WELL DONE) who will now go forward to represent the District at the Scottish Zonal camp in June 2018. During the camp we also tested out the new District necker concept and following universal approval we will be introducing this across the District in the 2018/2019 session.

Scouts at camp

Patrol at camp

Troops have been very active with numerous camps and expeditions. The Group reports provide more details. I am always amazed when reviewing the NAN forms that everyone keeps coming up with new sites to use.

Many Thanks to all the Scouts and their leaders for the great things they are doing.

Mark Hesketh DC

Explorers

A major focus for this year has been international Explorer Scouting – after a period when the District was not represented it is great to see two Patrols attending the Blair Atholl Jamborette in July, and Craigalmond Explorers are well represented in the South East Scotland World Scout Jamboree contingent with training and fund raising going ahead full steam for next year.

Explorers by reservoir in Pentlands

Explorers on DofE expedition

The international theme continues at Unit level – with a joint camp between the Pink Panther ESU and 122nd Craigalmond Scouts who attended a Danish Jamboree, Granton ESU who hosted Italian Scouts at camp in Loch Tay, and the Douglas Brown ESU who held a camp with the 10th Craigalmond Scouts in Italy which featured a trip up Monte Bianco by cable car, white water rafting through glacial run-off rivers and a whole variety of other adventurous activities.

More locally, the Pink Panthers challenged themselves to stay awake for 36 hours, eat a litre of ice cream and have bacon with every meal at Canty Bay at a Christmas camp while the Douglas Brown ESU went wild camping at Tynningham, followed by a visit to Foxlake Water Adventure, and are in the final preparation stage for a team of Explorers to complete the West Highland Way this summer.

Explorers playing Hungry Hippos

Pink Panthers play Hungry Hippos

The Craigalmond DofE Unit had a successful beginning last year – 13 Explorers undertook Bronze Expedition training and most have now completed their Bronze Awards, with many also achieving their Platinum Scout Award.  This has led on to a group of 15 Explorers who are well advanced with Silver expedition training leading to their 3-day Practice Expedition in the Peebles area. Meanwhile a second cohort of 8 Explorers has commenced Bronze and completed a successful 2-day Practice Expedition in the Pentlands in April in preparation for their Qualifying Expedition in the Lammermuirs in June. This group has made a huge difference boosting the achievement of both DofE and the core Scouting Awards within a year – and I’d like to thank Janet and her team for the huge amount of effort involved in getting this off the ground.

Explorers on DofE expedition

DofE group on expedition

Explorer Scouts continues to grow year on year – from 134 Explorer Scouts in 2017 to 146 Explorers this year including 15 in the Young Leader Unit, supported by 32 adults. This adult team are the often-unsung heroes who deserve great credit and recognition for their commitment and energy providing such a fantastic range of opportunities to Explorer Scouts in the District.

In terms of development, Youth Involvement is being driven by adoption of the Youth Approved Award and representation in the District Youth Advisory Group. The Pink Panther ESU successfully completed a move to Blackhall St Columba’s – to accommodate the expanding membership in a more central location for their catchment area and with more opportunities for outdoor meetings in the nearby Ravelston Park and Woods.

And finally, congratulations to Fraser Dunmore of the Pink Panther ESU on his fantastic achievement in completing his Queen’s Scout Award – he joined 200 Scouts to celebrate at Windsor Castle with Bear Grylls.

David Newton, DESC

Network

The term started out on a glamorous note as the Network suited up for a James Bond-themed casino night. The dress code at the snooker and bowling nights that followed was somewhat less snazzy – we just let our mad skills speak for themselves. But, more than anything, this term has been marked by a number of highly successful appearances at a local pub quiz. Knowing a little about a lot goes a long way, it seems!

In a very proud moment for our leader team, 5 of our number were selected for the 2019 Madagascar trip, attending an icy Bonaly selection camp in December and the first training camp in Angus in March. In preparation for the drainage works they’ll be carrying out on the expedition, the team tested their mettle against the rigors of ditch-digging(!), as well as quizzes, team building, hiking and fun with silly hats. Fact: You’re never too old for fun with silly hats.

Craigalmond Network is also delighted to be sending representatives to the 36th Blair Atholl Jamborette for international antics in July-August 2018. We’ve also been exploring the possibility of closer ties with Pentland and Braid Networks, and hope to hold an all-Edinburgh football game in the coming months. As always, we’re looking forward to the Scouting year to come!

Lisa McCreadie, DSNL

Youth Involvement

The role of ADC Youth Involvement is new to Craigalmond and to Scouts Scotland, so it’s been interesting and exciting to get to grips with something brand new. The role of the ADC(YI) is to make sure all the young people in the District get the opportunity to have a say in how their sections are run, and how the district works as a whole.

One key part of that is setting up our District Youth Advisory Group, a team of Explorers, Young Leaders and Network Scouts who meet regularly to share ideas and opinions, plan events within the District, and represent the opinions of all our youth members to the leaders on the District team. Over the year there’s been a reasonable degree of interest from our Explorers and we have had an initial exploratory meeting to work out how our own ‘DYAG’ will run. We expect to have it up and running next year, and to elect our own District Youth Commissioner who will join me in representing our young people in the District Team.

The other part is to support the sections and groups within the District to achieve their Youth Approved Awards, and to ensure that the District are working towards the same. Nearly all of our sections meet the standards for the Foundation award, and many are already working towards their bronze. Once all the sections in a group have achieved the Bronze Award, The Group can then go on to work towards their Silver and Gold level awards. So far in Craigalmond, we have achieved 10 Foundation awards, and one Bronze award. I’m looking forward to dropping in with sections a lot more next year to help them meet the standards and apply for their awards.

The role of ADC Youth Involvement is new to Craigalmond and to Scouts Scotland, so it’s been interesting and exciting to get to grips with something brand new. The role of the ADC(YI) is to make sure all the young people in the District get the opportunity to have a say in how their sections are run, and how the district works as a whole.

One key part of that is setting up our District Youth Advisory Group, a team of Explorers, Young Leaders and Network Scouts who meet regularly to share ideas and opinions, plan events within the District, and represent the opinions of all our youth members to the leaders on the District team. Over the year there’s been a reasonable degree of interest from our Explorers and we have had an initial exploratory meeting to work out how our own ‘DYAG’ will run. We expect to have it up and running next year, and to elect our own District Youth Commissioner who will join me in representing our young people in the District Team.

District Youth Advisory Group meet

Youth Involvement in action at the DYAG planning meeting. The Explorers wanted something to do with their hands while we talked, so we dug out the Knex from the cupboard!

The other part is to support the sections and groups within the District to achieve their Youth Approved Awards, and to ensure that the District are working towards the same. Nearly all of our sections meet the standards for the Foundation award, and many are already working towards their bronze. Once all the sections in a group have achieved the Bronze Award, The Group can then go on to work towards their Silver and Gold level awards. So far in Craigalmond, we have achieved 10 Foundation awards, and one Bronze award. I’m looking forward to dropping in with sections a lot more next year to help them meet the standards and apply for their awards.

Katie Goudie, ADC Youth Involvement

Fraser gets QSA at Windsor

Fraser gets QSA at Windsor

Chief Scout Bear Grylls recognises 300 young people as Scouting’s top achievers

Fraser Dunmore of Craigalmond was one of 300 Queen’s Scouts being honoured by international adventurer Chief Scout, Bear Grylls, at Windsor Castle for gaining their Queen’s Scouts Awards on Sunday 22 April.  Bear was joined by Princess Beatrice of York.

The Queen’s Scout Award is the highest honour in Scouting and is awarded for outstanding personal achievement.  This honour is achieved by young people aged between 16 and 25 who have completed a range of challenges, including service to their community, completing an expedition in wild country, undertaking a five-day residential project in an unfamiliar environment and learning a new skill or developing an existing talent.

Chief Scout Bear Grylls said:

During their time Scouting, all these young people have worked incredibly hard to learn new skills and achieve their Queen’s Scout Award and I am so full of admiration for their spirit, grit and determination.  They have served their community, led others and undertaken expeditions in the UK and around the world. As Queen’s Scouts, they are leading lights and an inspiration to over half a million Scouts in the UK and I am so pleased that Scouting has honoured them today. I am just so proud of all they have achieved.

Fraser says of his Award:

I really enjoyed completing my Queen’s Scout Award as it got me to really challenge myself. It really pushed me to do more for the community and inspire others to do the same! I would totally recommend anyone to complete the award.

Going down to Windsor was an experience I will never forget! Everyone was really kind and we were all there as we have all overcome some great challenges. It was amazing to hear all about other people’s experience while completing their award. It was really special to have talks from Bear Grylls and was even more amazing that they managed to get a video of Obama saying congratulations to all of us. The day was really hot and everyone was getting dehydrated but the QSWP looked after us all so well. My favourite part was getting a selfie with Bear Grylls! I would totally recommend anyone to complete the award so they can get the opportunity to go down to Windsor Castle too!

Queen's Scout Award badge

Queen’s Scout Award

 

Presentations at Windsor

The annual Windsor Castle event has been held regularly since 1934 on the Sunday nearest to St George’s Day (23 April).  St George is the Patron Saint of Scouting. Since the Queen’s Scout Award was instigated, over 100,000 of these awards have been presented to young men and women for outstanding personal achievements and service to their local communities.  They have learnt new skills and taken part in many of the 200 different activities on offer by Scouting across the UK.

The Queen's Scout Award

The Queen’s Scout Award is achieved by completing the following requirements:

  • Providing service to the community for 12 months. Briefing and training should be given in order to gain the necessary skills.
  • Learning a new skill for 12 months, and show progress and lasting interest. The skill can be the development of an existing interest or something entirely new.
  • Completing a four-day and three-night expedition in open or adventurous country by foot, cycle, horse, canoe, boat or dinghy. The expedition should involve careful preparation, training, responsibility and review demonstrating leadership and teamwork skills
  • Completing a five-day and four-night residential project in an unfamiliar environment with people who are not known. This project should be environmental work, activity based, service to others or personal training
  • Completing 18 nights away, of which 12 must be camping.
  • Making a presentation, to a suitable audience, of your achievements so far in working towards the Queen’s Scout Award.

The Award is for Explorers aged 16 and over and Network members.  It must be completed by the age of 25.  It is essential to register for the Award.  See details on Scouts UK site.

Danish Scouts visit

Danish Scouts visit

At the end of the very wintry month of March, a group of Danish Scouts came to Scotland to walk from Crianlarich to Fort William.  The nine Explorers (ages 13-15) and three leaders arrived carrying all their gear, carefully weighed to avoid Ryanair surcharges.

On arrival, they were able to spend a night in the 150th Craigalmond Scout hall, which they very much appreciated.  This follows a long Scouting tradition of helping visiting groups undertake adventurous trips, and it reminds us that we all wear the World Scout Membership Badge.  It is also a reminder that some of the pillars of Scouting are Fun, Friendship and Adventure.

The visitors presented the 150th with their very traditionally designed necker, and the Group hopes to link up with them as part of their World Challenge.

Danish necker

Necker of the Danish Explorers

The Danish Explorer Leader, Birgitte, wrote:

We had a fantastic trip up the West Highland Way and finished in Fort William on time. We had only one day with rain and a little snow, most of the time the sun was shining.  The spirit was great and the views amazing. Most of the group declared even before the departure from Edinburgh that they wanted to repeat the trip but start from the beginning some time.

Their photos give a sense of what they experienced.

John Buchanan    ARC Explorers

Danish Explorers do West Highland Way

Danish Explorers in March

Scout Group helps school

Scout Group helps school

The Comely Bank Scout Group (122nd Craigalmond) volunteered twice in 2017 to help improve the school playground at Flora Stevenson Primary School, in collaboration with the school’s Parent Council. Over 50 of our Young People across all sections – Beavers, Cubs, and Scouts – participated at one of the two events in May and then again in November, on Remembrance Sunday. Activities included sweeping and topping-up bark, clearing litter, painting benches and tree surrounds, and rehoming wandering sand. Moreover, outdoor play equipment was repainted at the nursery which is attached to the school. Our Young People thoroughly enjoyed themselves, and demonstrably felt a genuine sense of accomplishment; many outstayed their allotted time slots and braved inclement weather, fuelled in part by refreshments provided by the Parent Council. Although many of them do attend Flora Stevenson Primary School, the events saw Beavers, Cubs, and Scouts from other local schools volunteer, in line with the sense of community spirit we strive to encourage in our Group.

Nikola Popovic, ACSL